Tout (en)

  • The Changes So Far For The Linux 4.11 Kernel (Phoronix)
    We are now through week one of two for the Linux 4.11 kernel merge window. I've already written a number of news posts this past week covering features I find interesting for Linux 4.11. If you are short on time and behind in your Phoronix reading, here's a quick overview of the material so far for this next major kernel bump...
  • Sony Launches Phone With World's First 4K HDR Screen; Nokia Brings Back the 3310 Handset (Slashdot)
    Rumors were true. Nokia did launch its 3310 handset at MWC. It's been almost 17 years since the 3310 first came out. In that time the Nokia brand has been bought, sold, and stripped for parts. From a report on Wired: The 3310 is still very much a feature phone. It has a web browser, but only barely -- it's a dumbed-down version of Opera, basically there for emergency tweeting. It exists for you to make phone calls, send texts the way you did a decade ago (T9 FTW!), and play Snake. The 3310 weighs less than three ounces, and its battery lasts an absurd 31 days in standby time, or up to 22 hours of talk time. The new 3310 has a camera, for one thing, a 2-megapixel shooter. It also has a 2.4-inch, 240x320 screen, which is hilariously small and low-res but still a huge improvement over the original. It is priced at 49 Euros ($51). Also at the event, Sony announced that it is not done with putting a 4K screen on smartphones. From a report on The Verge: The XZ Premium has the world's first 4K HDR (2,160 x 3,840, High Dynamic Range) display in a smartphone. Sony has the latest and best Qualcomm chip while others are still offering the Snapdragon 820 and 821, but the Xperia XZ Premium won't be out until late spring or just ahead of the summer. Hell, the demo units shown off ahead of MWC weren't running anywhere close to final software -- so Sony is pre-announcing its new flagship device by a long margin. Other notable features include water resistance, rated to IP65 and IP68, a thinner profile at 7.9mm, and MicroSD storage expandability. The phone's battery is a reasonable 3,230mAh, and there's a fingerprint sensor integrated into the side-mounted power button as usual.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • A Look at Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS for Raspberry Pi (Linux Today)

    piboards: There is a lot of good work and potential in the latest Ubuntu MATE image for the Raspberry Pi.

  • Intel Reacts To AMD Ryzen Apparently Cutting Prices On Core i7 And i5 Processors (Slashdot)
    Less than a week after AMD announced the first line up of Ryzen processors, Intel is apparently fighting back by dropping the price of several of its processors. Rob Williams, writing for HotHardware: So, what we're seeing now are a bunch of Intel processors dropping in price, perhaps as a bit of a preemptive strike against AMD's chips shipping later this week -- though admittedly it's still a bit too early to tell. Over at Amazon, the prices have been slower to fall, but we'd highly recommend that you keep an eye on the following pages, if you are looking for a good deal this week. So far, at Micro Center we've seen the beefy six-core Intel Core i7-6850K (3.60GHz) drop from $700 to $550, and the i7-6800K (3.40GHz) drop down to $360, from $500. Also, some mid-range chips are receiving price cuts as well. Those include the i7-6700K, a 4.0GHz chip dropping from $400 to $260, and the i7-6600K, a 3.50GHz quad-core part dropping from $270 to $180. Even Intel's latest and greatest Kaby Lake-based i7-7700K has experienced a drop, from $380 to $299, with places like Amazon and NewEgg retailing for $349.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Khronos Announces OpenXR, WebGL 2.0 Finalized & More (Phoronix)
    The Khronos Group not only is shipping Vulkan 1.0.42 with many new extensions for this week's GDC but the embargo just expired on even more exciting announcements!..
  • BlackBerry KEYOne Announced: Snapdragon 625 with QWERTY, $549 (AnandTech)

    This week at MWC, TCL announced the BlackBerry KEYOne, which follows in BlackBerry's traditional style with a distinctive hardware QWERTY keyboard, but this time a more polished look at an Android implementation. The KEYOne implements a high-capacity battery, Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 625 SoC, Android 7.1, a 4.5” LCD display, and a USB-C connector for power and data. The KEYone will arrive in April at around $549.

    Last year BlackBerry Limited announced its intention to quit from the development and the manufacturing of smartphones, deciding to focus on creating and licensing its brand, other IP, and primarily its secure software suite for mobile devices. TCL became the primary licensee of BlackBerry and this is a company that will produce BlackBerry-branded devices going forward. TCL is currently the only global licensee of the trademark, so this KEYOne is the first BlackBerry-branded device, aiming at similar markets to BlackBerry's previous products.

    The KEYone is not the first BlackBerry-branded handset from TCL (the TCL-developed DTEK50 device released in 2016 essentially uses the same platform as the Alcatel Idol 4 handset), but this if the first one that was developed to be a BlackBerry from the ground up and used a close collaboration with BlackBerry Limited for the design. So, while the KEYone is produced by TCL, engineers from BBL have added their touch to the product. In addition, the phone comes with pre-loaded software from BlackBerry, including the BlackBerry DTEK application that monitor’s phones security.

    One of the product messages surrounding the launch was that when BBL and TCL started development of the KEYone, they set themselves a number of goals they wanted to achieve: keep the BlackBerry heritage, offer fast connectivity over today’s networks, ensure a long battery life, snappy multitasking performance, and make the device sturdy, yet stylish. We're sure that the sales numbers wil be the marker for how well they succeed.

    First off, the quintessential value add for BlackBerry users has always been the physical keyboard, so this stays. TCL decided to add functionality to the keyboard beyond just typing, which is why the keyboard becomes an extension to the display as it supports swiping and programmable shortcuts. TCL lists that this functionality is useful for scrolling, photo editing, and opening apps (with various gestures).

    Battery life is a major concern of virtually all smartphone users. To make the KEYone last as long as possible, TCL did two things: it installed a ~3500 mAh battery into the handset and also picked up the Qualcomm Snapdragon 625 SoC. The S625 is an SoC we're going to see a lot of in 2017, as an alternative to S652 phones: rather than using 2xA72/4xA53 on 28nm, the S625 offers 8xA53 but on Samsung's 14nm LPP process, so while the latter might actually be lower in peak performance, the smaller node and lower power cores enable significant battery life improvements. On the connectivity side of things, the Snapdragon 625 supports 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2  and integrates Qualcomm’s X9 LTE modem (Cat 7 LTE, up to 300 Mbit/s downlink and up to 150 Mb/s uplink).

      BlackBerry KEYone Specifications
    SoC Qualcomm Snapdragon 625 (MSM8953)
    8x ARM Cortex-A53 @ 2.0 GHz
    Adreno 506
    RAM  3 GB LPDDR3
    Storage 32 GB (eMMC)
    Display 4.5-inch 1620x1080 (434 ppi) with Gorilla Glass 4
    Network 3G: WCDMA (DB-DCHSDPA, DC-HSUPA),
    TD-SCDMA, EV-DO, CDMA1x
    2G: GSM/EDGE
    4G: depends on the version

    Canada, LATAM, APAC, US V1:
    LTE: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 13, 17, 19, 20, 28, 29, 30
    TDD LTE: 38, 39, 40, 41

    EMEA:
    LTE: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, 17, 20, 28
    TDD LTE: 38, 40

    US V2:
    LTE: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 12, 13, 20, 25, 26, 28, 29, 30
    TDD LTE: 41
    CDMA: BC 0, 1, 10

    LTE Down: 300 Mb/s
    Up: 150 Mb/s
    Audio Stereo speakers
    3.5-mm TRRS audio jack
    Dimensions see pictures
    Rear Camera 12 MP with f/2.0 aperture and dual LED flash
    Front Camera 8 MP
    Battery 3505 mAh with Qualcomm's FastCharging 3.0
    OS Android 7.1
    Connectivity 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.1, USB-C
    Sensors Fingerprint, accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, proximity, ambient light
    Navigation GPS, GLONASS (?)
    SIM Size NanoSIM
    Colors Black/Metallic
    Launch Country NA, EMEA (parts), APAC(?)
    Price $549/€599/£499

    The BlackBerry look is distinctive. There are virtually no phones with a keyboard today, and given the more modern design (compared to say, the Passport), this handset should stand out for more positive reasons. The keyboard uses stainless-steel strips between the rows for touch-type assistance and to aid the look. Since part of KEYone’s front panel is occupied by its QWERTY keyboard, the IPS display of the smartphone has a 3:2 aspect ratio in its 1620x1080 resolution, which is unusual for a smartphone.

    The KEYOne has a rather unique texture to the back of the device (the material TCL uses for the back side is unknown), which looks like processed leather or carbon fiber, but which is designed to be both sturdy and oleophobic. Moreover, this coating is designed to prevent the phone from slipping from hand during usage. As for the overall feel, the KEYone feels very solid, but its thickness is 0.37”, which is considerably thicker than that of most modern smartphones of comparable dimensions (Apple’s iPhone 7 is 0.28”, the iPhone 7 Plus is 0.29”). Part of this is down to the battery.

    When it comes to imaging, the BlackBerry KEYone uses Sony’s Exmor IMX378 and dual-tone flash as its primary camera as well as an 8 MP sensor (with selfie flash via LCD) on the front. Given the fact that the KEYOne is primarily targeting business users, nothing extra special was needed here.

    As for pricing and availability, the BlackBerry KEYone will hit the market in April in multiple countries at $549/€599/£499 price points. It's going to be interesting to see how many octo-A53 devices ever reach that price point.

  • Make Unity Look Like Chrome OS With a Tint2 Theme (Linux Today)

    Tint2 (formerly a panel app,) is a light-poids taskbar for Linux desktops with a large variety of configuration options

  • Indian State Saves $45 Million As Schools Switch To Open Source Software (Slashdot)
    From a report: The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore ($45 million) through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was only in 2005 that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. "It's not the cost saving that matters more, but the fact that the Free Software license enables not only teachers and students but also the general public an opportunity to copy, distribute and share the contents and use it as they wish," K. Anwar Sadath, executive director IT@School said.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Development Release: deepin 15.4 Beta (DistroWatch)
    deepin is a Linux desktop distribution based on Debian's Unstable branch. The deepin project develops the custom Deepin Desktop Environment, along with a collection of graphical application for playing media and installing software. The deepin project has announced the availability of a new development snapshot, deepin 15.4 Beta.....
  • The Speed Of LLVM's LLD Linker Continues Looking Good (Phoronix)
    LLVM's LLD linker still isn't too widely used yet on Linux systems, but the performance of this linker alternative to GNU Gold and GNU ld are quite compelling...
  • Logic Supply ML100G-50 Fanless Skylake vPro Industrial NUC Review (AnandTech)

    Passively cooled computing systems carry many advantages. Most of these turn out to be very important for industrial and embedded applications. The low power nature of the NUCs make them the ideal candidate for passive industrial computing platforms. We have already reviewed a number of industrial PCs before. Today, we have an off-the-shelf passively cooled Skylake vPro PC in for review from Logic Supply. Read on for our thoughts on this unique industrial PC.

  • Open Data Policies Necessary for Open Government (Linux Today)

    Open data is an important concept at Code for America, which addresses the widening gap between the public and private sectors in their effective use of technology and design.

  • Questioning The Privacy Policies Of Data-Collecting Cars (Slashdot)
    Remember when Vizio's televisions started collecting data about what shows people were watching? One transportation reporter is more worried about all the data being collected by cars. schwit1 quotes Autoblog: Nowadays, auto manufacturers seem to be tripping over each other pointing out that they offer Apple CarPlay and Google Android Auto. And more recent phenomenon are announcements -- from companies including Ford and Hyundai -- that they are offering Amazon Alexa capabilities. You talk. It listens... Here's the thing. While it may seem appealing to have all manner of connectivity in cars, there is the other side of that. Without getting all tinfoil hat about this, when your TV set is ratting you out, isn't it likely that your car will? It drives. And watches. And listens. And collects data... That data could be shared with everyone from auto insurers and advertisers to law enforcement officials and divorce attorneys. But the real problem may be consumers assuming strong privacy protections that don't actually exist. The article argues that GM's privacy policy "is like most privacy policies, which boils down to: You use it (the device, software, etc.), you potentially give up a portion of your privacy."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Entroware Launches Ubuntu-Powered Aether Laptop with Intel Kaby Lake CPUs (Linux Today)

    Meet Entroware Aether, a slim and fast laptop powered by Intel's 7th generation Kaby Lake processors that are perfect for all of your daily computing tasks.

  • Vulkan 1.0.42 Released With A Slew Of New Extensions: Multi-Device, VR, Semaphores (Phoronix)
    The "GDC Vulkan update" has arrived with a number of new extensions!..
  • OpenBenchmarking.org Turns Six Years Old (Phoronix)
    OpenBenchmarking.org has turned six years old while in June is when Phoronix.com will celebrate its 13th birthday and the Phoronix Test Suite has its 9th birthday...
  • Ask Slashdot: Would You Use A Cellphone With A Kill Code? (Slashdot)
    Slashdot reader gordo3000 writes: Given all the recent headlines about border patrol getting up close and personal with phones, I've been wondering why phone manufacturers don't offer a second emergency pin that you can enter that wipes all private information on the phone? In theory, it should be pretty easy to just input a different pin (or unlock pattern) that opens up a factory reset screen on the phone and in the background begins deleting all personal information. I'd expect that same code could also lock out the USB port until it is finished deleting the data, to help prevent many of the tools they now have to copy out everything on your phone. This nicely prevents you from having to back up and wipe your phone before every trip but leaves you with a safety measure if you get harassed at the border. It could be built into the operating system, added by the manufacturer, or perhaps sideloaded as a custom mod -- but that begs the question of whether it'd really be a popular feature. So leave your own thoughts in the comments. Would you use a cellphone with a kill code?

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Sony Launches Xperia XZ Premium and Xperia XZs Phones For US Market (AnandTech)

    Sony announced today at MWC 2017 that it’s bringing two new premium phones to the US market: the Xperia XZ Premium and Xperia XZs. Both models employ classic Sony styling—a rectangular shape with rounded sides and a flat top and bottom. They also have an aluminum frame sandwiched between front and rear Gorilla glass panels.

    There are a few significant differences between the new Xperias. For starters, the XZ Premium will use Qualcomm’s latest Snapdragon 835 SoC, the first to use semi-custom ARM CPU cores and the first SoC available on Samsung’s new 10nm process. The XZs will use the previous generation Snapdragon 820, which uses four fully-custom Kryo CPU cores.

    New Sony Xperia XZ Series
      Sony Xperia XZ Premium Sony Xperia XZs
    SoC Qualcomm Snapdragon 835
    (MSM8998)

    4x Kryo 280 Performance @ 2.45GHz
    4x Kryo 280 Efficiency @ 1.90GHz
    Adreno 540
    Qualcomm Snapdragon 820
    (MSM8996)

    2x Kryo @ 2.15GHz
    2x Kryo @ 1.59GHz
    Adreno 530 @ 624MHz
    Display 5.5-inch 3840x2160 HDR IPS LCD 5.2-inch 1920x1080 IPS LCD
    Dimensions 156.0  x 77.0 x 7.9 mm
    195 grams
    146.0 x 72.0 x 8.1 mm
    161 grams
    RAM 4GB LPDDR4x 4GB LPDDR4
    NAND 64GB + microSD 32GB / 64GB + microSD
    Battery 3230 mAh
    non-replaceable
    2900 mAh
    non-replaceable
    Front Camera 13MP, 1/3.06" Sony Exmor RS, f/2.0 13MP, 1/3.06" Sony Exmor RS, f/2.0
    Rear Camera 19MP, 1/2.3" Sony Exmor RS 19MP, 1/2.3" Sony Exmor RS
    Modem Qualcomm X16 (Integrated)
    2G / 3G / 4G LTE (Category 16/13)
    Qualcomm X12 (Integrated)
    2G / 3G / 4G LTE (Category 9/13)
    SIM Size NanoSIM (Dual SIM option) NanoSIM (Dual SIM option)
    Wireless Wi-Fi, BT 4.2, NFC, GPS/Glonass Wi-Fi, BT 4.2, NFC, GPS/Glonass
    Connectivity USB 3.1 Type-C, 3.5mm headset USB Type-C, 3.5mm headset
    Additional Features QC 3.0 fast charging, IP68 environment protection, high-resolution audio, stereo front-facing speakers QC 3.0 fast charging, IP68 environment protection, high-resolution audio, stereo front-facing speakers
    Launch OS Android 7.1 Android 7.1

    The XZ Premium is the larger of the two with a 5.5-inch TRILUMINOS display, which is notable for being the first panel to combine 4K resolution with HDR image support. It will be interesting to see if the display runs at 4K all the time or just when watching 4K content, scaling back to 1080p otherwise. The XZs puts a 5.2-inch 1080p TRILUMINOS display into a smaller chassis. Both displays support Sony’s X-Reality picture engine and Dynamic Contrast Enhancement technology.

    Sealed inside the XZ Premium is 3230 mAh battery, which is a little smaller than I would like to see for a 5.5-inch class phone with a high-resolution 4K display. A smaller chassis means an even smaller battery for the XZs at 2900 mAh. Based solely on this information, I’m a little concerned about battery life, but we’ll have to wait until devices start shipping to see how long they last. Both phones at least support Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0 fast charging.


    Xperia XZ Premium (left), Xperia XZs (right)

    In addition to 4GB of RAM, both phones also share some nice audio features, including support for high-resolution audio and stereo front-facing speakers. They also have an IP68 dust and water resistance rating, a feature Sony fans have grown accustomed to.

    It looks like both will have single and dual SIM versions. The dual SIM XZs comes with 64GB of internal storage like the XZ Premium, but the single SIM version only comes with 32GB. Storage can be expanded on all models with a microSD card.


    Xperia XZ Premium

    Both new XZ models use a similar camera configuration with a 13MP sensor behind an f/2.0 lens on the front and a 19MP sensor on the back. Both sensors are from Sony of course and are an integral part of the new Motion Eye camera system that incorporates technology from Sony’s a-series and Cyber-shot cameras, enabling 5x faster image scanning from the sensor. This means the Motion Eye cameras can capture super slow-motion video at an amazing 960fps (most phones are still stuck at 120fps or at most 240fps). The Predictive Capture feature starts buffering images when the camera detects motion, helping you capture fleeting moments you may have otherwise missed by allowing you to select from four photos taken up to 2 seconds before the shutter button was pressed. There’s also predictive hybrid autofocus that combines motion tracking and a motion prediction engine to lock onto an object and keep it in focus as it moves around.


    Xperia XZs

    The Xperia XZ Premium comes in two colors—Luminous Chrome and Deepsea Black—while the Xperia XZs offers three color options—Ice Blue, Warm Silver, and Black. The XZs will be available at select retailers, including Amazon and Best Buy, on April 5 for $699.99 (64GB). The XZ Premium will need to wait for the Snapdragon 835 SoC to become available, so it will not go on sale until later in the spring. Sony is not listing a price for it either, but it will most certainly cost more than the XZs.

  • New Open Source License Compatibility Company Debuts with a Bang (Linux Today)

    When I heard about FOSSA, my first thought was, "Don't Black Duck and Palamida already have the FOSS license compatibility thing pretty well sewed up?

  • VR-Using NV_dedicated_allocation Lands In RADV Mainline Driver (Phoronix)
    The NV_dedicated_allocation extension that is one of the Vulkan extensions needed by Valve's SteamVR on Linux, has now been enabled within mainline Mesa for the RADV driver...
  • How To Get Back To the Moon In 4 Years -- This Time To Stay (Slashdot)
    Scientific American describes "a way to get to the Moon and to stay there permanently...to begin this process immediately and to achieve moon landings in less than four years." It starts by abandoning NASA's expensive Space Launch System and Orion capsule, and spending the money saved on private-industry efforts like Elon Musk's SpaceX and Robert Bigelow's Bigelow Aerospace. schwit1 quotes their report: Musk's rockets -- the Falcon and the soon-to-be-launched Falcon Heavy -- are built to take off and land. So far their landing capabilities have been used to ease them down on earth. But the same technology, with a few tweaks, gives them the ability to land payloads on the surface of the Moon. Including humans. What's more, SpaceX's upcoming seven-passenger Dragon 2 capsule has already demonstrated its ability to gentle itself down to earth's surface. In other words, with a few modifications and equipment additions, Falcon rockets and Dragon capsules could be made Moon-ready... Major segments of the space community want every future landing to add to a permanent infrastructure in the sky. And that's within our grasp thanks to Robert Bigelow... Since the spring of 2016, Bigelow, a real estate developer and founder of the Budget Suites of America hotel chain, has had an inflatable habitat acting as a spare room at the International Space Station 220 miles above your head and mine. And Bigelow's been developing something far more ambitious -- an inflatable Moon Base, that would use three of his 330-cubic-meter B330 modules. The article calls Jeff Bezos's Blue Origin rockets "a wild car" which could also land passengers and cargo on the moon and suggests NASA would be better off funding things like lunar-surface refueling stations, lunar construction equipment, and "devices to turn lunar ice into rocket fuel, drinkable water, and breathable oxygen."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Can Streaming Companies Replace Hollywood Studios? (Slashdot)
    "Movie-theater attendance is down to a 19-year low, with revenues hovering slightly above $10 billion," reports Vanity Fair, arguing that traditional studios should feel threatened by nimble streaming companies like Netflix and Amazon, which produced the film Manchester By The Sea -- nominated for six Oscars. An anonymous reader writes: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos attended the Oscars, prompting host Jimmy Kimmel to joke that if the film won, "you can expect your Oscar to arrive in 2 to 5 business days, possibly stolen by a GrubHub delivery man." But it's a symbol of an inevitable disruption in Hollywood. "Studios now account for less than 10% of their parent companies' profits," writes Vanity Fair, adding "By 2020, according to some forecasts, that share will fall to around 5%... Some 70% of box office comes from abroad, which means that studios must traffic in the sort of blow-'em-up action films and comic-book thrillers that translate easily enough to Mandarin. Or in reboots and sequels that rely on existing intellectual property." Former Paramount CEO Barry Diller famously said "I don't know why anyone would want a movie company today. They don't make movies; they make hats and whistles." The article makes the case that Hollywood, "in its over-reliance on franchises, has ceded the vast majority of the more stimulating content to premium networks and over-the-top services such as HBO and Showtime, and, increasingly, digital-native platforms such as Netflix and Amazon. These companies also have access to analytics tools that Hollywood could never fathom, and an allergy to its inefficiency." The article argues that with A.I., CGI, big data and innovation, "Silicon Valley has already won," and that "it's only a matter of time -- perhaps a couple of years -- before movies will be streamed on social-media sites."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • AMD's Ryzen Will Really Like A Newer Linux Kernel (Phoronix)
    AMD's Ryzen CPU is finally shipping in a few days! If you are planning to be an early adopter of AMD Ryzen processors, you will really want to be running a newer Linux kernel release for proper support and performance...
  • Nuclear - An Electron-Based Music Streaming App for Linux (Linux Today)

    Nuclear is a beautifully designed Open Source multiplatform music streaming app that fetches media content from multiple online sources including YouTube and last.fm.

  • 'Uber Is Doomed', Argues Transportation Reporter (Slashdot)
    When an Uber self-driving car ran a red light last year, they blamed and suspended the car's driver, even though it was the car's software that malfunctioned, according to two former employees, ultimately causing Uber cars to run six different red lights. But technical issues may be only the beginning. An anonymous reader writes: Jalopnik points out that in 2016 Uber "burned through more than $2 billion, amid findings that rider fares only cover roughly 40% of a ride, with the remainder subsidized by venture capitalists" (covering even less than the fares of government-subsidized mass transit systems). So despite Google's lawsuit and other recent bad publicity, "even when those factors are removed, it's becoming more evident that Uber will collapse on its own." Their long analysis argues that the problems are already becoming apparent. "Uber, which didn't respond to questions from Jalopnik about its viability, recently paid $20 million to settle claims that it grossly misled how much drivers could earn on Craigslist ads. The company's explosive growth also fundamentally required it to begin offering subprime auto loans to prospective drivers without a vehicle." Last month transportation industry analyst Hubert Horan calculated that Uber Global's losses have been "substantially greater than any venture capital-funded startup in history."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 701 (DistroWatch)
    This week in DistroWatch Weekly: Reviews: OBRevenge OS 2017.02News: Mageia 6's ongoing delays, NetBSD offers reproducible builds, Red Hat considers if we still need swap spaceMyths and misunderstandings: Can Netflix run on a Raspberry Pi?Released last week: pfSense 2.3.3, Rebellin Linux 3.5, Zenwalk 220217Torrent corner: AUSTRUMI, Elastix, KaOS,....
  • Is Google's Comment Filtering Tool 'Vanishing' Legitimate Comments? (Slashdot)
    Slashdot reader Lauren Weinstein writes: Google has announced (with considerable fanfare) public access to their new "Perspective" comment filtering system API, which uses Google's machine learning/AI system to determine which comments on a site shouldn't be displayed due to perceived high spam/toxicity scores. It's a fascinating effort. And if you run a website that supports comments, I urge you not to put this Google service into production, at least for now. The bottom line is that I view Google's spam detection systems as currently too prone to false positives -- thereby enabling a form of algorithm-driven "censorship" (for lack of a better word in this specific context) -- especially by "lazy" sites that might accept Google's determinations of comment scoring as gospel... as someone who deals with significant numbers of comments filtered by Google every day -- I have nearly 400K followers on Google Plus -- I can tell you with considerable confidence that the problem isn't "spam" comments that are being missed, it's completely legitimate non-spam, non-toxic comments that are inappropriately marked as spam and hidden by Google. Lauren is also collecting noteworthy experiences for a white paper about "the perceived overall state of Google (and its parent corporation Alphabet, Inc.)" to better understand how internet companies are now impacting our lives in unanticipated ways. He's inviting people to share their recent experiences with "specific Google services (including everything from Search to Gmail to YouTube and beyond), accounts, privacy, security, interactions, legal or copyright issues -- essentially anything positive, negative, or neutral that you are free to impart to me, that you believe might be of interest."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • GNU Linux-Libre 4.10: GPU Drivers Remain The Most Frequent Offenders (Phoronix)
    The GNU Linux-libre 4.10 kernel was released last weekend just after the official Linux 4.10 kernel release while I hadn't noticed the de-blobbed kernel release until today. The Linux-libre folks continue to criticize the open-source GPU DRM drivers as being offenders for using binary blob firmware/microcode...
  • Science Fiction Actor Bill Paxton Dies At Age 61 (Slashdot)
    Bill Paxton died Saturday at the age of 61 after complications from surgery. An anonymous reader remembers Paxton's work with some YouTube clips: Bill Paxton starred in a surprising number of cult science fiction favorites. After playing both the blue-haired punk rocker who confronts The Terminator and the mean older brother in John Hughes' nerd comedy Weird Science, Paxton was cast as private Hudson in Aliens, the soldier who at one point wails "Game over, man!" Sigourney Weaver called his performance "brilliant," while James Cameron said Paxton's character released some of the audience's tension. [For Hudson's climactic final showdown with the aliens] "Bill made up different dialogue on every take, and he was yelling it over a machine gun, so none of it actually recorded." Paxton also appeared in Predator 2, Apollo 13, Twister, and James Cameron's Titanic. Most recently he provided the voice of the executive Kahn in Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare and had a recurring role as Hydra agent John Garrett in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Peruse: A Comic Book Reader for Linux Desktops (Linux Today)

    Peruse is an Open Source comic book reader developed by the KDE team to simplify reading comic books on your KDE desktop environment

Quand l'eau courbe un bâton, ma raison le redresse,
La raison décide en maîtresse.
Mes yeux, moyennant ce secours,
Ne me trompent jamais, en me mentant toujours.
-+- Jean de La Fontaine (1621-1695),
Un animal dans la lune (Fables VII.17) -+-