Linux (en)

  • Wine-Staging 5.0-RC5 Brings Fix For Far Cry 5 Plus Sound Bug With Proton/ESYNC (Phoronix)
    Wine-Staging 5.0-RC5 is out today as usual, arriving just one day after the upstream Wine 5.0-rc5 release...
  • Arm Announces Cortex-A77 & Mali-G77 Valhall (Phoronix)
    In addition to AMD announcing their Ryzen 3000 line-up, Arm also used today at Computex 2019 to announce their new Cortex processor as well as a new Mali graphics processor and machine learning chip...
  • Ringing In 2020 By Clang'ing The Linux 5.5 Kernel - Benchmarks Of GCC vs. Clang Built Kernels (Phoronix)
    One of the interesting milestones this year in the compiler world was the ability with LLVM Clang 9.0 to compile Linux 5.3+ for x86_64 without needing any extra patches to either the kernel or the LLVM/Clang compiler. That initial support in Linux 5.3 was not without a few issues, but on Linux 5.5 the experience is in great shape with the stable Clang compiler.
  • LLVM Picks Up 3DNow! Improvements In 2017 (Phoronix)
    As a flashback to the past, hitting the LLVM Git/SVN code today were improvements for those still running with processors supporting AMD's 3DNow! extensions...
  • Thoughts on Our Possible Future Without Work (Slashdot)
    There's a new book called A World Without Work by economics scholar/former government policy adviser Daniel Susskind. The Guardian succinctly summarizes its prognostications for the future: It used to be argued that workers who lost their low-skilled jobs should retrain for more challenging roles, but what happens when the robots, or drones, or driverless cars, come for those as well? Predictions vary but up to half of jobs are at least partially vulnerable to AI, from truck-driving, retail and warehouse work to medicine, law and accountancy. That's why the former US treasury secretary Larry Summers confessed in 2013 that he used to think "the Luddites were wrong, and the believers in technology and technological progress were right. I'm not so completely certain now." That same year, the economist and Keynes biographer Robert Skidelsky wrote that fears of technological unemployment were not so much wrong as premature: "Sooner or later, we will run out of jobs." Yet Skidelsky, like Keynes, saw this as an opportunity. If the doomsayers are to be finally proven right, then why not the utopians, too...? The work ethic, [Susskind] says, is a modern religion that purports to be the only source of meaning and purpose. "What do you do for a living?" is for many people the first question they ask when meeting a stranger, and there is no entity more beloved of politicians than the "hard-working family". Yet faced with precarious, unfulfilling jobs and stagnant wages, many are losing faith in the gospel of work. In a 2015 YouGov survey, 37% of UK workers said their jobs made no meaningful contribution. Susskind wonders in the final pages "whether the academics and commentators who write fearfully about a world with less work are just mistakenly projecting the personal enjoyment they take from their jobs on to the experience of everyone else". That deserves to be more than an afterthought. The challenge of a world without work isn't just economic but political and psychological... [I]s relying on work to provide self-worth and social status an inevitable human truth or the relatively recent product of a puritan work ethic? Keynes regretted that the possibility of an "age of leisure and abundance" was freighted with dread: "For we have been trained too long to strive and not to enjoy." The state, Susskind concedes with ambivalence, will need to smooth the transition. Moving beyond the "Age of Labour" will require something like a universal basic income (he prefers a more selective conditional basic income), funded by taxes on capital to share the proceeds of technological prosperity. The available work will also need to be more evenly distributed. After decades of a 40-hour week, the recent Labour manifesto, influenced by Skidelsky, promised 32 hours by 2030. And that's the relatively easy part. Moving society's centre of gravity away from waged labour will require visionary "leisure policies" on every level, from urban planning to education, and a revolution in thinking. "We will be forced to consider what it really means to live a meaningful life," Susskind writes, implying that this is above his pay grade. The review concludes that "if AI really does to employment what previous technologies did not, radical change can't be postponed indefinitely. "It may well be utopia or bust."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Apple's Stock Rose 86% in 2019 -- Partly Because Of AirPods (Slashdot)
    "Shares of Apple gained 86.2% in 2019, according to data from S&P Global Market Intelligence," reports the Motley Fool: The tech stock's share price tracked relatively closely with momentum for the broader market for much of the year and then dramatically outperformed from September through December thanks to strong performance for its wearables products. iPhone Sales were down from 2018, but they still came in ahead of expectations, and the company's business was lifted by strong performance for its wearables segment... Growth for Apple's services segment (which includes revenue generated from the company's mobile app store and subscription-based offerings like Apple Music) also slowed in the year. However, explosive growth for AirPods, promising momentum for the Apple Watch, and the promise of a bigger tech and feature leap for the iPhone line in 2020 powered a great year for Apple stock. Toni Sacconaghi, an analyst at Bernstein Research, estimates that AirPod sales came in at roughly $6 billion in 2019 and nearly doubled compared to 2018. The Bernstein analyst projects that AirPod revenue will hit $15 billion in 2020.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • New AMD GPU Performance To Be Boosted By Linux 4.5; How It Compares To The Binary Blob (Phoronix)
    Last week I posted some AMD proprietary vs. open-source AMD Linux driver benchmarks using the very latest code. Left out of that earlier comparison was the R9 Fury series with Fiji GPU as well as newer graphics cards using the Tonga GPU. These graphics cards are supported by the AMDGPU DRM driver rather than the long-standing Radeon DRM driver. As I've been mentioning a lot this week, Linux 4.5 will bring the PowerPlay power management / re-clocking support to AMDGPU. In this article are showing benchmarks of the Fiji and Tonga GPUs under Linux 4.4 and Linux 4.5 DRM-Next along with the Catalyst 15.9 driver as shipped by Ubuntu 15.10.
  • Development Release: Ubuntu 18.04 Beta 2 (DistroWatch)
    Steve Langasek has announced the availability of the second and final beta build of Ubuntu 18.04, including all official Ubuntu sub-projects. This is a long-term support (LTS) version the final release of which is scheduled for April 26: "The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the final beta....
  • GFX-RS Continues Advancing For High-Performance, Portable Graphics In Rust (Phoronix)
    GFX-RS has been the Rust programming language project for a high-performance, portable graphics API that can map to Vulkan, Apple's Metal, Direct3D, etc from a single Rust API...
  • It's 2020 And GCC Has Finally Converted From SVN To Git (Phoronix)
    I reported a few days ago GCC was hoping to transition to Git this weekend from their large SVN repository. Going into this weekend I wasn't going to be the least bit surprised if this transition got delayed again given all of the months of delays already, but actually, they went ahead and migrated to Git!..
  • SuperTuxKart 1.0 Released For Open-Source Linux Racing (Phoronix)
    SuperTuxKart, the open-source racing game inspired by Mario Kart and themed around Linux/Tux, has reached its 1.0 version after being in development the past 12+ years...
  • Looking Forward To The Linux 4.10 Kernel (Phoronix)
    The Linux 4.9 kernel will be officially released in about three weeks but there is already new features/functionality to get excited about for Linux 4.10...
  • An Ubuntu Kernel To Play With The New AMDGPU + Radeon 4.5 Features (Phoronix)
    If you are anxious to help test out the new changes of the Radeon and AMDGPU kernel drivers that will be added to Linux 4.5, I've spun up a kernel for Ubuntu x86_64 systems to try out this experimental code...
  • A Tour Of The New Phoronix Office (Phoronix)
    As most Phoronix readers know, earlier this summer I relocated from the high-tax, corrupted, crime-ridden Chicago to Indiana and with that Phoronix Media migrated. While my office configuration is slowly coming along and evolving, here's a look at things with most of the day-to-day setup now established. It's quite a different setup from the last Phoronix office tour two years ago. Like the last tour, this article is also to serve as some other recommendations I have about various products that otherwise wouldn't get (any or much) coverage on Phoronix but are worthy of a shout-out to Linux users and computer enthusiasts.
  • Reading the Crystal Ball on Tech Under Trump (Linux Today)

    The truth is, there's much more that we don't know about the incoming administration's planned policies than we do know.

  • Smaller ISPs Have Happier Customers, UK Based Study Says (Slashdot)
    Mark Wilson, writing for BetaNews: If you have eschewed the big names and opted for a smaller ISP, you probably have a happier broadband experience. These are the findings of a report which says the big four ISPs in the UK -- BT, Sky, Virgin Media and TalkTalk -- are rated lower than their smaller rivals. In fact, the highest rated provider, SSE, has only been in the broadband game since 2014, with Yorkshire-based Plusnet coming in second place, says Cable.co.uk. Of the big names, TalkTalk provides broadband to 13 percent of UK internet users, yet it scored just 6.66 out of 10 and placed in ninth position. The four biggest companies accounts for 87 percent of the market, but the best performer -- Sky -- only managed to hit fifth place.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • The Less-Powerful Intel Compute Stick With Ubuntu Will Soon Ship (Phoronix)
    Canonical confirmed today that the Intel Compute Stick preloaded with Ubuntu will go on sale next week at $110...
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP1 Advances Docker Container Support (Linux Today)

    ServerWatch: Linux vendor SUSE is out today with the first service pack update for SUSE Linux Enterprise 12. The big new addition is full support for Docker container though a number of different technologies.

  • Ask Slashdot: How Are So Many Security Vulnerabilities Possible? (Slashdot)
    dryriver writes: It seems like not a day goes by on Slashdot and elsewhere on the intertubes that you don't read a story headline reading "Company_Name Product_Name Has Critical Vulnerability That Allows Hackers To Description_Of_Bad_Things_Vulnerability_Allows_To_Happen." A lot of it is big brand products as well. How, in the 21st century, is this possible, and with such frequency? Is software running on electronic hardware invariably open to hacking if someone just tries long and hard enough? Or are the product manufacturers simply careless or cutting corners in their product designs? If you create something that communicates with other things electronically, is there no way at all to ensure that the device is practically unhackable?

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Mesa 17.3-RC5 Released, Official Mesa 3D Update Expected By Next Week (Phoronix)
    The Mesa 17.3 release game is in overtime but it should be wrapping up in the days ahead...
  • 10-Year-Old Boy Cracks the Face ID On Both Parents' IPhone X (Slashdot)
    An anonymous reader writes: A 10-year-old boy discovered he could unlock his father's phone just by looking at it. And his mother's phone too. Both parents had just purchased a new $999 iPhone X, and apparently its Face ID couldn't tell his face from theirs. The unlocking happened immediately after the mother told the son that "There's no way you're getting access to this phone." Experiments suggest the iPhone X was confused by the indoor/nighttime lighting when the couple first registered their faces. Apple's only response was to point to their support page, which states that "the statistical probability is different...among children under the age of 13, because their distinct facial features may not have fully developed. If you're concerned about this, we recommend using a passcode to authenticate." The boy's father is now offering this advice to other parents. "You should probably try it with every member of your family and see who can access it." And his son just "thought it was hilarious."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • BSD Release: DragonFly BSD 4.2.0 (DistroWatch)
    The DragonFly BSD team has announced the launch of DragonFly BSD 4.2.0. The new release includes a number of important new features and upgrades. DragonFly BSD 4.2.0 includes GNU's GCC 5 compiler as the default system compiler, offers improved graphics support and Sendmail has been replaced by a....
  • Benchmarks Of A ~$90 Android Chinese Netbook With Wondermedia SOC (Phoronix)
    For those curious about the performance out of the sub-$100 USD "Chinese netbooks" using the low-priced Wondermedia SoCs, here are some benchmarks...
  • EndGame CEO: Root Out Hackers Before They Strike (Slashdot)
    The CEO of Endgame, Inc. is calling for an "offensive mindset" to defend enterprises from hackers. An anonymous reader quotes Nate Fick's article on Quartz: Rather than relying on imperfect prevention techniques, or waiting for a breach to happen and then reacting to it, defenders need to 'turn the map around' and hunt proactively for the attackers in order to root out adversaries before they have a chance to do real damage. This is the next frontier of cybersecurity... the vast majority of cybersecurity spending is still going to prevention and perimeter security. Prevention is necessary, but it's not sufficient and it certainly doesn't justify 90 cents of every security dollar... The government has already figured this out. Across the Department of Defense, the intelligence community, and other forward-leaning agencies, this proactive hunting is already happening, and it's becoming more widespread. Enterprises need to embrace the same mindset. Fick points out that despite $75 billion on enterprise-level security spending, more than three-quarters of Fortune 500 companies have been breached within the last year.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • AMD Working On CUDA Source Translation Support To Execute On FirePro GPUs (Phoronix)
    Early this morning I wrote a brief article about AMD working on an LLVM-based Heterogeneous Compute Compiler and since then more details have come to light...
  • The Very Latest RadeonSI Git Code Provides Minor Benefits For Total War: WARHAMMER (Phoronix)
    Feral Interactive released Total War: WARHAMMER for Linux this week. On launch-day we provided NVIDIA Linux benchmarks as well as RadeonSI GPU benchmarks for this game over many different GPUs. Also landing on launch-day in Mesa Git were support for compiling optimized shader variants asynchronously in RadeonSI. So here are some benchmarks with the very newest Git to show the performance difference, which some have claimed is up to 25% faster. [This article was previously only available to Phoronix Premium members while is now available to everyone.]..
  • In 5 Years, Games Experience Will Move From Discrete To Indiscrete, Says EA CEO (Slashdot)
    The Verge has an insightful interview of Andrew Wilson, CEO of Electronic Arts. In the wide-ranging interview, Wilson has talked about how the landscape of video games have changed over the years, and where it will be in the next few years. One remarkable comment he has made is about how video games will move from discrete experience that we have today to indiscrete experience in the next coming years. From the article (condensed): The biggest shift I think we'll see is games moving from being a discrete experience to an indiscrete experience. When I was 15 years old, if I wanted to listen to music, I had a couple of choices. I could sit up all night and hope they'd play what I liked on the radio, or I could go down to the record store. [...] Today, by virtue of the fact that almost every device I own plays me music, and services like Spotify curate and cultivate and personalize that music for me, music permeates almost every aspect of my life. It's moved from being something I have to make a conscious decision to engage with, to something that really surrounds every aspect of my life from the minute I get up in the morning to the minute I go to bed at night. When we think about games today -- already we've got more people playing more games on more platforms in more geographies around the world than ever before. It's not just a console business, or a PC business, or even a mobile business. We've now got virtual reality and augmented reality and streaming, too. Now fast-forward that to the future, and you think about what the world looks like with a 5G network streaming latency-free gaming to every device you own. It's really easy to imagine that games would permeate our lives much the way digital music does today. From the minute I get up in the morning, everything I do has an impact on my gaming life, both discrete and indiscrete. The amount of eggs I have in my internet-enabled fridge might mean my Sims are better off in my game. That length of distance I drive in my Tesla on the way to work might mean that I get more juice in Need for Speed. If I go to soccer practice in the afternoon, by virtue of internet-enabled soccer boots, that might give me juice or new cards in my FIFA product. This world where games and life start to blend I think really comes into play in the not-too-distant future, and almost certainly by 2021.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Intel Enables Tessellation Shader Support In Open-Source Linux Driver (Phoronix)
    As an exciting early Christmas present for Intel Linux users, ARB_tessellation_shader support has landed in Mesa Git as needed by OpenGL 4!..
  • GNOME 3.18 On Fedora 23: X.Org vs. Wayland Performance (Phoronix)
    With GNOME 3.18 having many Wayland improvements, I decided to test out the GNOME 3.18 stack on Fedora 23 Beta when running GNOME on a conventional X.Org Server and then using GNOME on Wayland while running various OpenGL games.
  • Mozilla: Following In Sun's Faltering Footsteps? (Slashdot)
    snydeq writes: The trajectory of Mozilla, from the trail-blazing technologies to the travails of being left in the dust, may be seen as paralleling that of the now-defunct Unix systems giant Sun. The article claims, "Mozilla has become the modern-day Sun Microsystems: While known for churning out showstopping innovation, its bread-and-butter technology now struggles." It goes on to mention Firefox's waning market share, questions over tooling for the platform, Firefox's absence on mobile devices, developers' lack of standard tools (e.g., 'Gecko-flavored JavaScript'), and relatively slow development of Firefox OS, in comparison with mobile incumbents.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.